LSA Year in Review

Hi everyone! I have the pleasure of hosting a guest blog from our two fearless Law Student Association leaders from this past year, President Nirav Bhatt and Vice President Andrea Clavijo.

 Nirav was also a civil procedure teaching assistant for Professor Mark Brodin, the former president of the South Asian Law Students Association (SALSA), and a former 2L and 1L representative of the LSA. Andrea (or Dre, as her friends know her) was the founder of the BC Law Ambassadors program, a member of the Criminal Procedure Moot Court Team, and executive board member of the Latin American Law Students Association (LALSA), and a former secretary and 1L representative of the LSA. Both are amazing Eagles, friends, and people, and, on a personal note, my law school experience would not have been the same without them.


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Dear BC Law,

Thank you. As your outgoing elected leaders, we want to first and foremost send a huge thank you to all of you for your votes in confidence, your support and attendance at events, and, ultimately, your insightful and thoughtful suggestions to improve the student experience at BC Law. It has been an honor to represent the interests and needs of each and every one of you.

The BC Law community rightfully expects the Law Students Association (LSA), the student government on campus, to voice student concerns to the administration, preserve traditional programming that students have grown accustomed to, and use our resources and access to administrative leadership to continually improve student life at BC Law on all fronts – socially, academically, and professionally.

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Meet the Affinity Group Leaders: Zain Ahmad (SALSA)

Name: Zain Ahmad

Year: 2L, Class of 2017zbc

Affinity Group: South Asian Law Students Association (SALSA); President

Undergraduate Institution: Rutgers University, BA Political Science, graduated cum laude

Experiences between college and law school: 

I worked as a paralegal at Covington & Burling LLP in New York City for two years.

Favorite event that your organization plans:

I’m proud of SALSA’s programming this year. My favorite events are the ones where we collaborate with other student organizations on campus to advance important conversations forward. It was a pleasure working with the Women’s Law Center (WLC) on our first film screening of “He Named Me Malala” with an open discussion following the movie. I also enjoyed working with the Black Law Students Association (BLSA) on Culture Shock: Spectrums of Privilege and the ensuing conversations the event sparked. I am looking forward to our forthcoming collaboration with the Middle Eastern Law Students Association (MELSA) on Monday April 4th where we will have a roundtable discussion on breaking stereotypes in the current political climate. My hope this semester was to partner up with many student organizations on campus and help advance important conversations forward.

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Meet the Affinity Group Leaders: Dallas Taylor (BLSA)

Name:

 Dallas Taylor

FullSizeRenderYear:

2017 (2L)

Organization:

Black Law Students Association (BLSA) Co-President

Undergraduate Institution:

University of Missouri- Kansas City

BA, Political Science

Experiences between college and law school: 

I took 3 years off after high school before going back to college. In that time I traveled with a music group and worked with a young adult leadership organization. After undergrad I went straight into law school.

Favorite event that your organization plans:

Culture shock. The event is amazing because it gives law students a candid opportunity to talk about social issues in a safe environment.

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Meet the Affinity Group Leaders: Anna Hunanyan (MELSA)

Name: Anna Hunanyan

Year: 2L

Affinity Group: Middle Eastern Law Students Association (MELSA); pictureCo-President

Undergraduate Institution:

UCLA, BA Business Economics, BA Comparative Literature

Experiences between college and law school:

I took a year off before starting law school. I spent half of that year working as a financial analyst and the other half as a legal assistant.

Favorite event that your organization plans:

Every semester MELSA invites a speaker to discuss a timely and relevant issue concerning the Middle East. We have had cutting edge thinkers engage the BC Law community on topics such as free speech and hate speech, the Armenian Genocide, and the development of ISIS in Iraq and Syria. We have been lucky to host speakers with diverse backgrounds and experiences coming from different parts of the world. The perspective they bring and share is thought-provoking.

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Thoughts from a Double Eagle: We Are BC

2Ls (from left) Maria Colella, Ashley Gambone, and Margaret Capp ran the Red Bandanna Run with me on October 24th.

2Ls (from left) Maria Colella, Ryan Murphy, Ashley Gambone, and Margaret Capp, pictured with BC mascot Baldwin, ran the Red Bandanna Run on October 24th.

As I introduced myself to classmates, professors and administrators during orientation and throughout the first few weeks of 1L year, many of them asked where I attended college, or why I chose BC Law. I told them that I went to Boston College, and had such a great experience that I thought it would have been crazy, if given the chance to come back to BC, to go to law school anywhere else. I couldn’t even picture it. Their response was, more times than not, “oh, so you’re a double eagle!”

I had heard the phrase “double eagle” tossed around in college from time to time. For those of you who haven’t, members of the BC community affectionately call people with two BC degrees (including diplomas from BC High) “double eagles.” Similarly, the more exclusive “triple eagle” title signifies three BC degrees.

Being from New York, and not knowing many BC alumni, the term “double eagle” never seemed like more than a catchphrase used in the community. But as I get closer to attaining my second degree, it has become much more than that for me.

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On Campus: A Dialogue on Gun Rights & Gun Control (Audio)

As a 3L at BC Law, I am always impressed with our student body’s desire to engage each other on tough and important issues of law and society. Whether we are discussing matters of constitutional law, diversity and inclusion, corporate governance, criminal justice, health care, civil rights, or any number of issues, our student groups love to spark extracurricular debate and discussion.

One such group is the American Constitution Society, an organization dedicated to developing progressive leaders in the legal field. Yesterday, the BC Law chapter of the ACS hosted an event entitled “ACS: A Dialogue About Gun Control & Gun Rights” featuring Michael Ball ’18 and myself. This was a highly-structured dialogue that was intended to be educational, productive, and intellectually honest. Gun rights and gun policy are a sensitive issue, and our goal as a progressive student group was to make sure that we enter that policy sphere with as much education on the subject as possible.

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What You Need for 1L, Day 1

Starting off my 1L year, I was several years out of college. This was anxiety inducing for several reasons, but one, in particular, I didn’t expect: I had no idea what an adult human being in graduate school needed to bring to class. Do I bring notebooks? Every single one of my 50-pound books? Maybe get my hands on a trapper keeper? (Fun fact: I 100% owned that trapper keeper in the 4th grade.)

To help you avoid the onset of organizational stress, and facilitate your inevitable Staples run, I’ve compiled a list of some items you may want to think about bringing on the first day.

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BC Law Life: The Public Interest Law Foundation Auction (or, How to Get Paid for Doing Public Interest Work)

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BC students and faculty bid on items at the annual Public Interest Law Foundation Auction on March 27, 2015.

As someone who knew they wanted to do public interest work, one of my biggest concerns coming into law school was how I was going to fund my summers. Public interest summer internships almost never pay, and particularly if you’re looking to work outside of Boston, the prospect of having no income and potentially paying two rents can be really daunting.

Thankfully, for students at BC Law, there’s an on-campus solution: getting funding from the Public Interest Law Foundation (or PILF). Continue reading

America, for a minute

Think it sounds a bit ridiculous? That’s because you’re not an Eagle (yet). Being a member of the BC Law community has been an amazing adventure with tremendous opportunities for growth, kinship, and self-discovery. As difficult as it was to leave that commiunity and come to London, I imagined it would be even more difficult to not return for two of my favorite, spring BC Law events: Admitted Students Day; and, of course, LAW PROM!

For anyone other than a 1L (they’re a bit bitter about how much energy you pre-Ls have, and that you smile when talking about studying law) Admitted Students Day is absolutely awesome. For me, personally, Admitted Students Day is about bringing everything full circle, and giving back to a community that has time and again given so much to its students.

While I was back on campus this past weekend I was able to welcome many of you, sit in on a live Civil Procedure class with Prof. Spiegel, field some of your questions during a delicious lunch, give a tour of the law school, AND serve on a career services panel.

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Things I Wish I Knew, Vol. 3: Admitted Students Day is well worth your time

Okay, so I should preface this by saying that I didn’t have the opportunity to attend an Admitted Students Day event and the first day I set foot on the BC Law campus was two days before orientation. I spent the next month entirely overwhelmed by the things I didn’t know, and even more so by the things I didn’t know I didn’t know.

But it didn’t have to be that way.

I had the opportunity to volunteer with the February 20th Admitted Students Day and I’m retroactively kicking my butt for not making time to come to one of these, because I got so many of Pre-1L Charlene’s questions answered in one fell swoop.

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