What Are We Up To This Summer?

Exams are wrapping up, we’re finishing those last spot checks of final papers, and most importantly, getting ready for our summer jobs. Here’s what some of the Impact bloggers are up to this summer.

Brianna: I will be working this summer at Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility (PEER) in Washington, D.C. PEER is a national nonprofit that fills the unique niche of serving the public employees who protect our environment. PEER works with government agency employees to address environmental wrongs while protecting their identities and also provides free legal help for those who suffer retaliation from their supervisors after blowing the whistle themselves. PEER advocates for strong scientific integrity policies and procedures and has an array of ongoing policy and public education campaigns. As a Legal Intern, I will assist the Senior Counsel, Executive Director, Staff Attorney, and Field Directors in litigation, working on tasks that could range from complaint drafting to discovery to settlement negotiations or trial prep. PEER’s cases often involve federal legislation such as the National Environmental Policy Act, the Endangered Species Act, the Whistleblower Protection Act, and the Freedom of Information Act. I will also conduct initial intake interviews with public employees who contact PEER and legal research to explore any potential environmental law and ethics violations that these callers raise.

Marcus: This summer I’m going to be at Ropes & Gray, a stronghold law firm, splitting my time between their Boston and NYC offices. I’ll be doing corporate work, rotating between their various corporate departments.

Christina: I will be doing a judicial internship at Riverhead Justice Court on Long Island, New York, for Judge Allen Smith.

Erika: I am interning at Hurwitz, Richard & Sencabaugh LLP this summer. They are a small firm that does some licensing and business law. I’ll be doing research and perfecting my memo writing.

Jae: I am joining the Office of Massachusetts Attorney General’s Environmental Crimes Strike Force as a summer legal intern. The Strike Force (a division of the Office’s Energy and Environment Bureau) investigates/prosecutes polluters that harm or pose a significant threat to the state’s environment, natural resources, or the health and safety of the public. I came to law school to study environmental law, and could not be happier.

Jorge: This summer I’ll be working as a Legal Intern at TripAdvisor. TripAdvisor offers trusted advice from travelers and a wide variety of travel choices and planning features with seamless links to booking tools that check hundreds of websites to find the best prices. The sites operate in 47 countries worldwide, reaching 350 million unique monthly visitors and 290 million reviews and opinions covering more than 5.3 million accommodations, restaurants and attractions. The in-house team handles a majority of TripAdvisor’s legal matters including: Contracts, SEC Reporting, Compliance, Corporate Governance, Intellectual Property, Litigation, Mergers and Acquisitions, Employment Law and International Matters. As a legal intern, I will be assigned projects across these diverse legal areas to maximize my exposure. This business setting provides a unique outlook on the implications of the law because, in a sense, we are the client.

Alex: This summer I’ll be at the Capital Appeals Project in New Orleans, LA, working on death penalty appeals. CAP is a non-profit contracted by the state of Louisiana to handle all indigent death penalty appellate cases. I’m excited to be in a new (albeit humid) city and to explore the South on weekends.

A Thin Yellow Line

This spring, BC Law Impact is excited to present guest posts from current students about the factors that drove them to BC Law and the impact the community has had on their lives. Today’s post comes from 2L Hannah Jellinek.


Cheshire Correctional Institution sits atop an uncharacteristically tall hill given the generally flat land surrounding the prison. Perhaps because of this elevation, the long thin driveway, and the large red brick façade, the prison has a haunting and overwhelming presence. The front doors lead to a separate world. One where razor sharp barbed wire sits on top of chainlink fences and seemingly cuts into the bright blue skies and puffy white clouds. One where you see kids running around freely, smiling and laughing, but then realize their obstacle course and hide and seek spots are the long wooden benches of the visitation room. The Cheshire world is separate from the small houses of the town, separate from the run-down basketball courts across the street, separate from what I have previously known outside of the gates.

Once I go through the weekly routine of submitting my license, clearing the metal detector, and gathering the light pink VISITOR pass, I walk out of the waiting room and through the lobby. A bright yellow line on the dark brown floors divides the hallways of Cheshire. It is what separates us from them. The free individuals who can decide their next step, their next meal, their next shower, from those on the other side of the line who decide nothing.

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My Summer with a Judge

What’s it like to be a judge?

It’s my sixth week of working for Judge Dineen Riviezzo of the Kings County (Brooklyn) Supreme Court. Judge Riviezzo hears felony cases and Article 10 civil confinement cases. Also, every Friday, she’s in charge of the juvenile offender part, where she hears cases involving 14, 15, and 16-year-olds who would normally be heard in Family Court, but because they commit certain serious crimes, are heard in Supreme Court (but are often afforded youthful offender treatment).

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View of Brooklyn from the Judge’s chambers

So far, I can say that being a judge requires three major qualities.

First, it requires patience. Whether it’s dealing with an attorney’s mistake, sorting out a disagreement between the parties, or waiting for a defendant to be produced or parties to show up, I’ve learned that for judges, every day is a test of patience. Continue reading

Summer Associate, Week 1: 59 Thoughts

Okay, so granted, I was also a summer associate last year.

Last summer, I wrote to you about what it was like to be a 1L at a firm and how much I was able to do despite how little we feel like we learn in law school. After having the honor of being asked back to the same firm for this summer, I decided to shake it up a little bit. I was feeling inspired by BuzzFeed’s recent posts of the same nature on Season 6 of Game of Thrones, so I decided to give you all an “unfiltered” peek into what my first week as a summer associate at a firm in Western New York was like, with some Michael Scott references peppered in — because, after all, I do work in an office.

  1. Heels hurt. I can practically hear my toes monologuing about why they hate me.
  2. Okay, but the way heels click across a floor makes you sound like a boss. I feel like I’m in the beginning of that Jordan Sparks song. Like, look at me, I’m important, I know where I’m going-
  3. Uh oh. Where am I going?
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Things I Wish I Knew, Vol. 9: Law school doesn’t teach you how to be a lawyer, and that’s kind of okay

It defies our concepts of professional school, right?

Dentistry school: learn how to make people’s teeth healthy. Physical therapy school: help people regain lost movement. Electrician school, beauty school, you name it – all pretty much teach you everything you need to know to accomplish the job you’ll have after graduation.

Law school is the odd man out. Even attorneys I know who took classes in the area of law they now practice say that they learned most of how to do their job after they got it. That’s why I when someone asks me what type of law I want to practice, I always want to reply, “Well, I don’t think I know how to practice any type of law.”

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